REQUEST A REP

CHECKMATE 816: FOR PATIENTS WITH RESECTABLE NSCLC, REGARDLESS OF PD-L1 EXPRESSION

Superior pCR & EFS with neoadjuvant OPDIVO®
(nivolumab) + chemo1-3*

EFFICACY: pCR and EFS

OPDIVO-based
combinations in
Earlier Stages
of Cancer
Checkmate 816 Efficacy: pCR And EFS with Neoadjuvant OPDIVO® (nivolumab) + Chemotherapy, Chart Checkmate 816 Efficacy: pCR And EFS with Neoadjuvant OPDIVO® (nivolumab) + Chemotherapy, Chart

Median EFS at minimum follow-up of 32.9 months (extended follow-up analysis)

  • OPDIVO + chemo - NR (95% CI: 31.6-NR)
  • Chemo - 21.1 mos (95% CI: 14.8-42.1)

HR=0.68 (95% CI: 0.49–0.93)

  • pCR: 0% residual viable tumor cells in both the primary tumor (lung) and sampled lymph nodes2‡
  • EFS: Time from randomization to disease progression that precludes surgery, disease progression/recurrence after surgery, progression for patients without surgery, or death due to any cause
  • In the ITT population, the estimated treatment difference for pCR was 21.6% (95% CI: 15.1-28.2); P<0.00011,2

*

vs chemo. Based on primary analysis.1

OPDIVO, in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated for neoadjuvant NSCLC (tumors ≥4 cm or node positive).1

Per BIPR. Includes those not undergoing surgery, who will be considered as not achieving pCR.5

§

Per BICR. Extended follow-up is exploratory analysis.3

BICR=blinded independent central review; BIPR=blinded independent pathological review; CI=confidence interval; EFS=event-free survival; HR=hazard ratio; ITT=intent to treat; NR=not reached; pCR=pathological complete response.

Select Important Safety
Information

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 816, adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients (n=176) who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions in >2% included pneumonia and vomiting. No fatal reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy.

Common Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 816, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm (n=176) were nausea (38%), constipation (34%), fatigue (26%), decreased appetite (20%), and rash (20%).

Please see additional Important Safety Information below.

Overall survival with neoadjuvant OPDIVO + chemo*

OS, ITT (pre-specified interim analysis at 3 years)3

Checkmate 816 OS, ITT (Pre-Specified Interim Analysis at 3 Years), Chart Checkmate 816 OS, ITT (Pre-Specified Interim Analysis at 3 Years), Chart

*

Limitation: OS data (HR=0.57 [95% CI: 0.38–0.87]), were immature at the pre-specified 2-year interim analysis, as well as at the 3-year update, and did not cross the boundary for statistical significance. These results should be interpreted with caution.2,3

Consistent pCR observed* with neoadjuvant OPDIVO + chemo, regardless of stage1,2,6

pCR ITT Primary analysis and SUBGROUP analysis by stage of disease

Checkmate 816 pCR, ITT Primary Analysis and Subgroup Analysis by Stage of Disease, Chart Checkmate 816 pCR, ITT Primary Analysis and Subgroup Analysis by Stage of Disease, Chart

Minimum follow-up of 7.6 months.2

Limitation: Checkmate 816 was not powered to detect differences in treatment effect within individual stage subgroups; therefore, this exploratory analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the limited patient numbers and potential imbalances in baseline characteristics within the subgroup.

  • pCR: 0% residual viable tumor cells in both primary tumor (lung) and sampled lymph nodes2*
  • In the ITT population, the estimated treatment difference for pCR rate was 21.6% (95% CI: 15.1–28.2); P<0.00011,2

*

Per BIPR. Includes those not undergoing surgery, who will be considered as not achieving pCR.5

Baseline stage of disease by CRF; TNM 7th edition used for classification.6

BIPR=blinded independent pathological review; CI=confidence interval; CRF=case report form; ITT=intent to treat; pCR=pathological complete response; TNM=classification of malignant tumors.

Neoadjuvant OPDIVO + chemo: 3 cycles of treatment studied in stage IB-IIIA resectable NSCLC patients1,2,4*

Checkmate 816 Study Design Graphic Checkmate 816 Study Design Graphic
  • 83% of patients treated with neoadjuvant OPDIVO + chemo received definitive surgery and 75% with chemo1

Primary endpoints

  • pCR (per BIPR): 0% residual viable tumor cells in both the primary tumor (lung) and sampled lymph nodes
  • EFS (per BICR): Time from randomization to disease progression that precludes surgery, disease progression/recurrence after surgery, progression for patients without surgery, or death due to any cause3

Key secondary endpoint

  • OS1
  • The trial excluded patients with unresectable or metastatic NSCLC, known EGFR mutations or ALK translocations, Grade 2 or greater peripheral neuropathy, active autoimmune disease, or medical conditions requiring systemic immunosuppression1
  • Within the ITT population, 50% had tumors with PD-L1 expression ≥1%, 51% had tumors with squamous histology, and 49% had tumors with non-squamous histology1

*

Platinum-doublet chemo q3w for 3 cycles; NSQ: pemetrexed and cisplatin or paclitaxel and carboplatin; SQ: gemcitabine and cisplatin or paclitaxel and carboplatin.1

Per the 7th edition American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) staging critera.1

Determined by the PD-L1 IHC 28-8 pharmDx assay (Dako); PD-L1 <1% stratification includes patients with PD-L1 expression status not evaluable and indeterminate.4

§

The approved recommended dosage of OPDIVO per the Prescribing Information is 360 mg q3w with platinum-doublet chemo on the same day q3w for 3 cycles.1

||

In the platinum-doublet chemo arm, two additional treatment regimen options included vinorelbine and cisplatin, or docetaxel and cisplatin (any histology).1

Per BIPR. Includes those not undergoing surgery who will be considered as not achieving pCR.5

ALK=anaplastic lymphoma kinase; BICR=blinded independent central review; BIPR=blinded independent pathological review; ECOG PS=Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status; EFS=event-free survival; EGFR=epidermal growth factor receptor; HCP=healthcare professional; IHC=immunohistochemistry; ITT=intent to treat; NSCLC=non-small cell lung cancer; NSQ=non-squamous; OS=overall survival: pCR=pathological complete response; PD-L1=programmed death-ligand 1; q3w=every 3 weeks; SQ=squamous.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)
Category 2A recommended1,7

NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) recommendation

All patients with resectable NSCLC should be evaluated for preoperative therapy7*

Neoadjuvant nivolumab (OPDIVO) + platinum-doublet chemotherapy
is recommended as a Category 2A therapy option for eligible patients with resectable
(tumor ≥4 cm or node positive‡) NSCLC, regardless of PD-L1 expression1,7

*

Contraindications for treatment with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors may include active or previously documented autoimmune disease and/or current use of immunosuppressive agents; some oncogenic drivers (ie, EGFR exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R, ALK rearrangements) have been shown to be associated with less benefit from PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Otherwise refer to the Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Patients Not Candidates for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.7

Platinum-doublet chemo q3w for 3 cycles: any histology: carboplatin and paclitaxel or cisplatin and paclitaxel; NSQ: cisplatin and pemetrexed; SQ: cisplatin and gemcitabine. Chemotherapy regimens for patients not candidates for cicsplatin-based therapy: NSQ: carboplatin and pemetrexed; SQ: carboplatin and gemcitabine.1

Please see updated NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for a complete listing of all NCCN-recommended agents, including preferred options. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way.

OPDIVO + chemo: 3 cycles of treatment prior to surgery1,2*

Dosing Graphic: 3 Cycles of Neoadjuvant OPDIVO® (nivolumab) + Chemotherapy q3w Dosing Graphic: 3 Cycles of Neoadjuvant OPDIVO® (nivolumab) + Chemotherapy q3w
  • OPDIVO is administered as an IV infusion over 30 minutes1
  • Refer to the respective Prescribing Information for each therapeutic agent for the recommended dosage and administration information as appropriate
  • Administer OPDIVO first, followed by platinum-doublet chemo on the same day1*
  • No premedication required with OPDIVO1

*

Platinum-doublet chemo consisted of paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 or 200 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC 5 or AUC 6 (any histology); pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 (non-squamous histology); or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 or 1250 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 (squamous histology). In the platinum-doublet chemo arm, two additional treatment regimen options included vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 or 30 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2, or docetaxel 60 mg/m2 or 75 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 (any histology).1

AUC=area under the curve; IV=intravenous; Pt=platinum.

×

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) + Chemotherapy

Lung Podcast Episode #2

Exploring Clinical Implications of a Neoadjuvant Treatment Option for Patients With Early-Stage Resectable NSCLC

Moderator:

Welcome back to the “Bristol Myers Squibb Immuno-oncology Podcast,” a podcast dedicated to keeping listeners updated on current findings within the immuno-oncology treatment landscape. Today’s program is intended for US health care professionals only.

I’m Joseph Ritchie, an executive medical science liaison with BMS, and I am joined again today by our wonderful guest, Dr Jason Porter, a medical oncologist and hematologist at the West Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tennessee.

Please note that Dr Porter is a consultant for BMS and was compensated for his role in this podcast. Thank you again for joining us today, Dr Porter. Before we kick off today’s episode, can you please briefly go over some of the key highlights from last week’s episode regarding Checkmate-9LA?

Speaker:

Yes, thank you for having me again, Joe. To quickly recap, in last week’s episode, we chatted about an approval regarding an OPDIVO® (nivolumab) plus YERVOY® (ipilimumab)–based combination treatment in first-line non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Checkmate-9LA was a cross-histology, phase 3, randomized open-label trial in patients who had metastatic or recurrent NSCLC, that evaluated OPDIVO plus YERVOY with 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy in comparison with 4 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy as the comparator arm.1,2 In the extended follow-up analysis of Checkmate-9LA, the OPDIVO plus YERVOY combination treatment arm demonstrated continued durable survival as a first-line therapy for adult patients with recurrent or metastatic NSCLC, with 27% of patients alive at 3 years in comparison with 19% of patients alive with chemotherapy only. Additionally, the study showed consistent overall survival (OS) benefit across PD-L1 positive and negative patients. For PD-L1 negative patients, 25% of patients in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY combination treatment arm were alive at 3 years in comparison to 15% of patients in the comparator arm.2,3

Moderator:

Thank you for that succinct summary, Dr Porter. For our listeners today, we will be discussing OPDIVO® (nivolumab) plus chemotherapy as the first and only neoadjuvant treatment option for patients with early-stage resectable NSCLC, based upon the results of the pivotal Checkmate-816 clinical trial.1

Before we discuss data from this trial, I want to mention that OPDIVO and YERVOY are associated with the following Warnings and Precautions:

  • Severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions including pneumonitis, colitis, hepatitis and hepatotoxicity, endocrinopathies, nephritis with renal dysfunction, dermatologic adverse reactions, other immune-mediated adverse reactions, infusion-related reactions, complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), embryo-fetal toxicity, and increased mortality in patients with multiple myeloma when OPDIVO is added to a thalidomide analogue and dexamethasone, which is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Please stay tuned for the full Indication and Important Safety Information about OPDIVO and YERVOY at [18 min and 30 seconds].

Moderator:

Hello again Dr Porter, and welcome back! So today is all about Checkmate-816 and how it has paved the way for the use of OPDIVO in adult patients with resectable tumors ≥4 cm or node positive, in non-small cell lung cancer in the neoadjuvant setting, in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy.1 Could you please speak to the significance of this treatment option within the NSCLC landscape?

Speaker:

Currently, around 25% of patients who receive a diagnosis of NSCLC have resectable disease. Unfortunately, we know that 30 to 55% of patients who get curative surgery will eventually die of disease recurrence.4 But we also know that neoadjuvant chemotherapy can be utilized to treat patients with resectable disease.5 However, the absolute difference in 5-year recurrence-free survival and overall survival with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in comparison with surgery alone is approximately 5 to 6 percentage points. Additionally, few patients achieve a complete pathological response, which is an endpoint that usually serves as a potential early predictor of survival. So clearly there is a need for more effective systemic treatments for nonmetastatic disease across perioperative contexts.4

And based on the results of the Checkmate-816 study, there is a benefit in receiving neoadjuvant chemoimmunotherapy for patients with Stage IB to Stage IIIA resectable NSCLC.4

Moderator:

Thank you for providing the context in which OPDIVO plus chemotherapy fits into this treatment landscape. But before we chat about the clinical data, how would you describe the study design of Checkmate-816, and which patients are eligible for this treatment?

Speaker:

The Checkmate-816 study was an international, open-label, phase 3 trial that evaluated patients with resectable NSCLC. A total of 358 patients, before undergoing surgery, were evenly randomized in a 1:1 ratio to be administered either OPDIVO 360 mg intravenously over 30 minutes plus platinum-doublet chemotherapy or platinum-doublet chemotherapy alone every 3 weeks for up to 3 cycles.1,4

Definitive surgery was scheduled to occur within 6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment, after which patients in both the treatment and comparator arms could receive up to 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both.4

Median follow-up time in all randomized patients was 29.5 months.4

Checkmate-816 accepted adult patients with resectable, histologically confirmed Stage IB including patients with tumors ≥4 cm, to Stage IIIA NSCLC as per the staging criteria of the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer or the AJCC 7, as well as an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance-status score of 0 or 1, and no previous anti-cancer therapy.4

Patients with unresectable or metastatic NSCLC, known EGFR mutations or ALK translocations, Grade 2 or greater peripheral neuropathy, active autoimmune disease, or medical conditions requiring systemic immunosuppression were excluded from the study.1

The Checkmate-816 study stratified patients for randomization by their tumor PD-L1 expression level so ≥1% versus <1%, their disease stage so Stage IB/II versus Stage IIIA, and sex, male versus female.1

50% of the study’s patients had tumors with PD-L1 expression ≥1%.1

35% had Stage IB or II disease and 64% had Stage IIIA disease.1

51% had tumors with squamous histology and 49% had tumors with non-squamous histology.1

To assess efficacy, Checkmate-816 had 2 primary endpoints, pathologic complete response (pCR) and event-free survival (EFS). pCR was evaluated by blinded independent pathology review and EFS was evaluated by blinded independent central review. The study’s key secondary endpoint is overall survival.1

Based on the results of this study, OPDIVO is indicated in the neoadjuvant setting for adult patients with resectable NSCLC in which tumors are ≥4 cm or node positive, in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy.1

Moderator:

Let’s talk a little bit more about those two co-primary endpoints. How are they defined in the Checkmate-816 study and what results led to the approval of OPDIVO plus chemotherapy as neoadjuvant treatment in early-stage resectable NSCLC?

Speaker:

Pathological complete response was defined as having 0% residual viable tumor cells in the primary tumor and sampled lymph nodes according to blinded independent pathological review. Event-free survival was defined as the time from randomization to any progression of disease precluding surgery, progression or recurrence of disease after surgery, progression of disease in the absence of surgery, or death from any cause.4

In the intention-to-treat (ITT) population, 24% of all patients, regardless of resection, achieved pathological complete response in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm in comparison with only 2.2% in the chemotherapy only arm. The estimated treatment difference for pCR was 21.6% with a P value <0.0001.1,4

Furthermore, consistent pCR was observed in patients on OPDIVO plus chemotherapy, regardless of stage. Patients at Stage IB to II reached pCR at 26% in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy group in comparison with 5% in the chemotherapy only group. For patients at Stage IIIA, it was 23% in comparison with 1%, respectively.4,6

Median event-free survival was 31.6 months with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy and 20.8 months with chemotherapy alone with a hazard ratio of .63 and a P value of 0.0052. This translates to a 37% reduced risk of disease progression, recurrence, or death with the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy treatment arm. At 2 years, we continued to see consistent event-free survival benefit with 63.8% in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm and 45.3% with chemotherapy alone.4

As a note however, Checkmate-816 was not powered to detect differences in treatment effect within individual stage subgroups or within PD-L1 subgroups. So these exploratory analyses should be interpreted with caution due to the limited amount of patients and potential imbalances in baseline characteristics within the subgroups.6

Moderator:

Thank you for walking us through the efficacy data. As you mentioned earlier, overall survival was also a key secondary endpoint from the trial and I believe this endpoint would be of great interest to a lot of other practitioners. Based on your opinion, what is important to note about the data for overall survival?

Speaker:

At the first prespecified interim analysis, the overall survival data was immature and did not indicate statistical significance. With that being said, the hazard ratio was 0.57 and at 2 years, 83% of patients were alive with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy and 71% of patients were alive with chemo. The data will continue to be monitored over time and I’m excited to see the results.4

Moderator:

Earlier in our conversation you mentioned how neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy demonstrated superior pathological complete response as well as event free survival regardless of PD-L1 status and disease stage. I think this nicely highlights the significance of starting therapy early for resectable patients with NSCLC. When we think about bringing in systemic therapy, we want to balance safety and ensure that we're not going to potentially prevent a patient from going into surgery. Can you please elaborate on the reported safety profile for Checkmate-816, including the common and serious adverse events experienced by the patients within the study?

Speaker:

First off, before I speak about the reported adverse reactions, I would like to address the mechanism of action for the immune checkpoint inhibitor in that it increases presentation of the tumor to the immune system. I fundamentally cannot understand taking the tumor out and then giving the immune system a boost. And so, it makes more sense to me that if I'm training for instance, police officers, that I would send them first through an obstacle course that will be similar to what they’re going to encounter in the field.

And when I think about the tumor and giving the immune checkpoint inhibitor while the tumor’s still in place, with all of its antigens that could possibly stimulate the immune system, it makes more sense to provide neoadjuvant therapy. And then when we look at the safety profile of OPDIVO, I think it is really beneficial in addition to chemotherapy.

In Checkmate-816, the most common adverse reactions in >20% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus chemotherapy were nausea, constipation, fatigue, decreased appetite, and rash.1

he most common Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus chemotherapy were neutropenia, hyperglycemia, leukopenia, lymphopenia, increased amylase, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and hyponatremia.1

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy, and in >2% of patients this included pneumonia and vomiting. No fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who were in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm.1

Treatment with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy was permanently discontinued due to adverse reactions in 10% of patients and 30% had at least one treatment withheld as a result of an adverse reaction. The most common adverse reactions in ≥1% of patients leading to permanent discontinuation of OPDIVO plus platinum-doublet chemotherapy were anaphylactic reaction, acute kidney injury, rash, and fatigue.1

Another thing that is relevant to note is the kind of experience the surgeon is going to have when they take those patients to surgery after these resectable patients in early-stage NSCLC undergo neoadjuvant treatment with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy.

In terms of surgical data, 83.2% in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm and 75.4% in the platinum-doublet chemotherapy comparator arm underwent definitive surgery.4

Overall, the safety and the capability for my early-stage resectable patients with NSCLC to undergo surgery after neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy has been very beneficial within my clinical practice.

Moderator:

Besides the individual impact of neoadjuvant therapy in your clinical practice, one thing that comes to mind that can be very different in the metastatic and nonmetastatic setting for your resectable patients with NSCLC, is the importance of the multidisciplinary team. Obviously, this involves identifying the patients before surgery, but in terms of having that discussion with your multidisciplinary team, what would you recommend as a best practice for other groups when they are coordinating decision-making for these early-stage patients within their multidisciplinary team?

Speaker:

I really, really think that every patient who is a surgical candidate should be presented at a multidisciplinary tumor board. I recommend that surgeons really need to look closely at the patient’s profile, and endobronchial ultrasound, or EBUS, needs to be a standard of care for those patients because I need to stage and understand a mediastinal disease from the beginning. What you want to avoid is placing a patient under consideration as a surgical candidate and then have to backtrack and say that they are not a surgical candidate. Ultimately, this is going to happen inevitably, because in some patients, they may no longer be surgically resectable due to progression of disease, or their performance status may deteriorate. So these things unfortunately do happen.

I know there are some settings where there is not a big tumor board in place. And I know in smaller community settings that is often the case. In those instances however, I think that every patient deserves a direct phone call to the physician that they are being referred to. As a medical oncologist, if I am going to refer to a surgeon who is not on the tumor board, I would call and have a discussion with that surgeon and tell them exactly what I am thinking, get their impression as well, and then discuss again after the surgeons sees the patient. This ensures that we are on the same page about how we're going to approach our patient's care.

But outside of that, all eligible patients should be presented in a multidisciplinary tumor board. I also recommend early molecular testing. Not PD-L1 status because fortunately that’s not a deciding factor here as we discussed earlier, but testing for the presence of oncogenic drivers such as EGFR and ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

So early testing for relevant biomarkers should be standard and we need to do that for each surgically resectable patient, and they should all be presented to a surgeon upfront. The surgeon should not be making a unilateral decision on whether or not a patient is a surgical candidate or how to approach a patient’s care before the medical oncologist addresses whether or not the patient can tolerate or receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Radiation oncologists need to be involved in the conversation as well.

Moderator:

Absolutely agree, patients deserve that collaboration from their doctors. Let's say that you have your multidisciplinary discussion, and you arrive at the decision to initiate neoadjuvant treatment with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy in an early-stage resectable patient with NSCLC. What are some of the main factors that help you make your decision over the alternative which would be to send the patients to a surgeon first?

Speaker:

First of all, the location of disease is the priority concern. So for example, if a patient were to have subcarinal adenopathy that is single station and not a contralateral, mediastinal disease, I would administer neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy in this patient. If there is a patient with a smaller tumor that I'm a little bit less concerned about, I would possibly consider surgery upfront. However, if their tumor is at least 4 centimeters or node positive, then they are a candidate for neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy in that setting. In Checkmate-816, we saw how 24% of patients achieved pathologic complete response with OPDIVO plus chemotherapy treatment, as opposed to only 2.2% with chemotherapy alone.1 If I think there is an obvious chance that I can give my patient a clear shot to achieve pCR, I should give that therapy upfront.

But even for smaller tumors I think neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy regimen is relevant and can be used for treatment, as well as in nodal disease, in which systemic therapy is needed early. However, I decide on a case-by-case basis.

Moderator:

Thanks so much again for talking through all of the data regarding Checkmate-816 as well as sharing your experiences today. To summarize, what advice would you give to your peers if they wanted to go about incorporating OPDIVO plus platinum-doublet chemotherapy into their treatment algorithm for patients with early-stage resectable NSCLC?

Speaker:

For patients with early-stage resectable NSCLC, I think that any patient that is going to have surgery and has at least a 4-centimeter tumor or has nodal involvement is an appropriate candidate for neoadjuvant OPDIVO plus chemotherapy.1

Based on the pivotal results of Checkmate-816, patients treated with OPDIVO plus platinum-doublet chemotherapy achieved superior pathological complete response and event-free survival, in which 24% of patients in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm achieved a pathological complete response in comparison with 2.2% with chemotherapy only.4

Additionally, patients in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm also had 37% reduced risk of progression, recurrence, or death.4

I also highly recommend that all eligible patients be presented to a multidisciplinary tumor board to ensure physician alignment on treatment, especially since resectable NSCLC patients have the option for neoadjuvant treatment prior to surgery.

Moderator:

Thank you so much, Dr Porter. Before we close today’s episode, sponsored by BMS, please listen to the full Indications and Important Safety Information for OPDIVO and YERVOY.

INDICATIONS

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated as neoadjuvant treatment of adult patients with resectable (tumors ≥4 cm or node positive) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab) and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of OPDIVO or YERVOY. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of OPDIVO and YERVOY. Monitor for signs and symptoms that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment with OPDIVO and before each dose of YERVOY. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if OPDIVO or YERVOY interruption or discontinuation is required, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.1% (61/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (2.1%).

Immune-Mediated Colitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2.9% (58/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.7%) and Grade 2 (1%).

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis and Hepatotoxicity

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 1.8% (35/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (1.3%), and Grade 2 (0.4%).

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, immune-mediated hypophysitis, immune-mediated thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1% (20/1994), including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.6%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (0.3%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 2 (0.2%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.7% (54/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) and Grade 2 (1.2%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (163/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (4.8%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, diabetes occurred in 0.9% (17/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.3%), and 2 cases of diabetic ketoacidosis.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated nephritis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 1.2% (23/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.5%), and Grade 2 (0.6%).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

OPDIVO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes.

YERVOY can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, including bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, SJS, TEN, and DRESS. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-bullous/exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (171/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (2.2%).

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received OPDIVO monotherapy or OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; nervous system: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; musculoskeletal and connective tissue: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis, and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; other (hematologic/immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection.

In addition to the immune-mediated adverse reactions listed above, across clinical trials of YERVOY monotherapy or in combination with OPDIVO, the following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions, some with fatal outcome, occurred in <1% of patients unless otherwise specified: nervous system: autoimmune neuropathy (2%), myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis, motor dysfunction; cardiovascular: angiopathy, temporal arteritis; ocular: blepharitis, episcleritis, orbital myositis, scleritis; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis (1.3%); other (hematologic/immune): conjunctivitis, cytopenias (2.5%), eosinophilia (2.1%), erythema multiforme, hypersensitivity vasculitis, neurosensory hypoacusis, psoriasis.

Some ocular IMAR cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, which has been observed in patients receiving OPDIVO and YERVOY, as this may require treatment with systemic corticosteroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Infusion-Related Reactions

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY in patients with severe (Grade 3) or life-threatening (Grade 4) infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild (Grade 1) or moderate (Grade 2) infusion-related reactions. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 6.4% (127/1994) of patients. In a separate trial in which patients received OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion or a 30-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (8/368) and 2.7% (10/369) of patients, respectively. Additionally, 0.5% (2/368) and 1.4% (5/369) of patients, respectively, experienced adverse reactions within 48 hours of infusion that led to dose delay, permanent discontinuation or withholding of OPDIVO.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with OPDIVO or YERVOY. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between OPDIVO or YERVOY and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. The effects of YERVOY are likely to be greater during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Increased Mortality in Patients with Multiple Myeloma when OPDIVO is Added to a Thalidomide Analogue and Dexamethasone

In randomized clinical trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of OPDIVO to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with multiple myeloma with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of OPDIVO or YERVOY in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 816, serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients (n=176) who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions in >2% included pneumonia and vomiting. No fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. In Checkmate 9LA, serious adverse reactions occurred in 57% of patients (n=358). The most frequent (>2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea, febrile neutropenia, anemia, acute kidney injury, musculoskeletal pain, dyspnea, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 7 (2%) patients, and included hepatic toxicity, acute renal failure, sepsis, pneumonitis, diarrhea with hypokalemia, and massive hemoptysis in the setting of thrombocytopenia.

Common Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 816, the most common (<20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm (n=176) were nausea (38%), constipation (34%), fatigue (26%), decreased appetite (20%), and rash (20%). In Checkmate 9LA, the most common (<20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (49%), musculoskeletal pain (39%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (31%), rash (30%), decreased appetite (28%), constipation (21%), and pruritus (21%).

Please see US Full Prescribing Information for OPDIVO and YERVOY [in the show notes].

Moderator:

Before we end, I’d just like to thank you for providing your insights again today, Dr Porter. I would also like to thank our listeners for tuning in.

Speaker:

It was a pleasure, thank you so much for having me back to discuss this important treatment.

Moderator:

This concludes our discussion of the clinical efficacy and safety findings for OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. References for the information discussed on today’s episode can be found [in the show notes].

References:

  1. OPDIVO [package insert]. Princeton, NJ: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company.
  2. Paz-Ares LG, Ciuleanu TE, Cobo-Dols M, et al. First-line nivolumab + ipilimumab + 2 cycles of chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone (4 cycles) in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: 3-year update from CheckMate 9LA. Poster presentation at ASCO 2022. Abstract LBA9026.
  3. Paz-Ares L, Ciuleanu TE, Cobo M, et al. First-line nivolumab plus ipilimumab combined with two cycles of chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (CheckMate 9LA): an international, randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. 2021;22(2):198-211.
  4. Forde PM, Spicer J, Lu S, et al. Neoadjuvant nivolumab plus chemotherapy in resectable lung cancer. N Engl J Med. 2022;386(21):1973-1985.
  5. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Accessed September 29, 2022. https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/nscl.pdf.
  6. Forde PM, Spicer J, Lu S, et al. Nivolumab + platinum-doublet chemotherapy vs chemotherapy as neoadjuvant treatment for resectable (IB–IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer in the phase 3 CheckMate 816 trial. Oral presentation at AACR 2021. Abstract CT003.
Safety Data

View a selected safety profile of adverse reactions seen in clinical trials.

See Data
Dosing Schedule

Find dosing information to get patients started on therapy.

View Schedule
More NSCLC Indications

Learn how OPDIVO and OPDIVO-based combinations treat
non-small cell lung cancer.

Choose Another Indication

See OPDIVO + YERVOY dual I-O efficacy data in multiple tumor types

Learn more about how OPDIVO
is approved for use in earlier
stages of cancer

See Indications

Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma (fixed-dose therapy)

Opdualag™ (nivolumab and relatlimab-rmbw) is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age or older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated as neoadjuvant treatment of adult patients with resectable (tumors ≥4 cm or node positive) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

OPDIVO, in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express PD-L1 (≥1%) as determined by an FDA-approved test, with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO, in combination with YERVOY and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving OPDIVO.

Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with intermediate or poor risk advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO, in combination with cabozantinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who have received prior anti-angiogenic therapy.

Gastric, Gastroesophageal Junction, or Esophageal Cancers

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of completely resected esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer with residual pathologic disease in adult patients who have received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT).

OPDIVO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced, recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) after prior fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-based chemotherapy.

OPDIVO, in combination with fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-containing chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

OPDIVO, in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

OPDIVO, in combination with fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-containing chemotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction cancer, and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Melanoma

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with completely resected Stage IIB or Stage IIC melanoma.

OPDIVO is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with completely resected Stage III or Stage IV melanoma.

OPDIVO, in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

OPDIVO, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

Urothelial Carcinoma

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with urothelial carcinoma (UC) who are at high risk of recurrence after undergoing radical resection of UC.

OPDIVO, in combination with cisplatin and gemcitabine, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma.

OPDIVO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma who have disease progression during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy or have disease progression within 12 months of neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment with platinum-containing chemotherapy.

Unresectable Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck on or After Platinum-Based Therapy

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with disease progression on or after platinum-based therapy.

Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Previously Treated With Sorafenib

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have been previously treated with sorafenib. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the confirmatory trials.

MSI-H/dMMR Metastatic Colorectal Cancer That Has Progressed Following Treatment With a Fluoropyrimidine, Oxaliplatin, and Irinotecan

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric (12 years and older) patients with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Relapsed or Progressed cHL After Autologous HSCT and Brentuximab Vedotin or After 3 or More Lines of Therapy Including Autologous HSCT

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) that has relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and brentuximab vedotin or after 3 or more lines of systemic therapy that includes autologous HSCT. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

7356-US-2300210  06/23

IMPORTANT SAFETY
INFORMATION

Summary of Warnings and Precautions for OPDIVO

View More

OPDIVO is associated with the following Warnings and Precautions: severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions including pneumonitis, colitis, hepatitis and hepatotoxicity, endocrinopathies, nephritis with renal dysfunction, dermatologic adverse reactions, other immune-mediated adverse reactions; infusion-related reactions; complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); embryo-fetal toxicity; and increased mortality in patients with multiple myeloma…

OPDIVO is associated with the following Warnings ...

Summary of Warnings and Precautions for Opdualag

View More

Opdualag (nivolumab and relatlimab-rmbw) is associated with the following Warnings and Precautions: severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions (IMARs); infusion-related reactions; complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); and embryo-fetal toxicity.

Opdualag (nivolumab and relatlimab-rmbw) is...

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) logo

OPDIVO IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of OPDIVO or YERVOY. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of OPDIVO and YERVOY. Monitor for signs and symptoms that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment with OPDIVO and before each dose of YERVOY. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if OPDIVO or YERVOY interruption or discontinuation is required, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.1% (61/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (2.1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 7% (31/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.0%), and Grade 2 (4.4%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.9% (26/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.4%) and Grade 2 (2.6%). In NSCLC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 9% (50/576) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.5%), Grade 3 (3.5%), and Grade 2 (4.0%). Four patients (0.7%) died due to pneumonitis.

In Checkmate 205 and 039, pneumonitis, including interstitial lung disease, occurred in 6.0% (16/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 4.9% (13/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO, including Grade 3 (n=1) and Grade 2 (n=12).

Immune-Mediated Colitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2.9% (58/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.7%) and Grade 2 (1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 25% (115/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.4%), Grade 3 (14%) and Grade 2 (8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 9% (60/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.4%) and Grade 2 (3.7%).

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis and Hepatotoxicity

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 1.8% (35/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (1.3%), and Grade 2 (0.4%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 15% (70/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (2.4%), Grade 3 (11%), and Grade 2 (1.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (1.2%), Grade 3 (4.9%), and Grade 2 (0.4%).

OPDIVO in combination with cabozantinib can cause hepatic toxicity with higher frequencies of Grade 3 and 4 ALT and AST elevations compared to OPDIVO alone. Consider more frequent monitoring of liver enzymes as compared to when the drugs are administered as single agents. In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, Grades 3 and 4 increased ALT or AST were seen in 11% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, immune-mediated hypophysitis, immune-mediated thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1% (20/1994), including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 8% (35/456), including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.5%), and Grade 2 (4.1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 4.7% (15/320) of patients, including Grade 3 (2.2%) and Grade 2 (1.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (0.3%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 9% (42/456), including Grade 3 (2.4%) and Grade 2 (6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 4.4% (29/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 2 (0.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, thyroiditis occurred in 2.7% (22/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.5%) and Grade 2 (2.2%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.7% (54/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) and Grade 2 (1.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 9% (42/456) of patients, including Grade 3, (0.9%) and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 12% (80/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (4.5%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (163/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (4.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 20% (91/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (11%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 18% (122/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (11%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, diabetes occurred in 0.9% (17/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.3%), and 2 cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, diabetes occurred in 2.7% (15/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated nephritis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 1.2% (23/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.5%), and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated nephritis with renal dysfunction occurred in 4.1% (27/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (1.1%), and Grade 2 (2.2%).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

OPDIVO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes.

YERVOY can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, including bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, SJS, TEN, and DRESS. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-bullous/exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (171/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (2.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 28% (127/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.8%) and Grade 2 (10%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 16% (108/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (3.5%) and Grade 2 (4.2%).

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received OPDIVO monotherapy or OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; nervous system: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; musculoskeletal and connective tissue: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis, and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; other (hematologic/immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

In addition to the immune-mediated adverse reactions listed above, across clinical trials of YERVOY monotherapy or in combination with OPDIVO, the following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions, some with fatal outcome, occurred in <1% of patients unless otherwise specified: nervous system: autoimmune neuropathy (2%), myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis, motor dysfunction; cardiovascular: angiopathy, temporal arteritis; ocular: blepharitis, episcleritis, orbital myositis, scleritis; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis (1.3%); other (hematologic/immune): conjunctivitis, cytopenias (2.5%), eosinophilia (2.1%), erythema multiforme, hypersensitivity vasculitis, neurosensory hypoacusis, psoriasis.

Some ocular IMAR cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, which has been observed in patients receiving OPDIVO and YERVOY, as this may require treatment with systemic corticosteroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Infusion-Related Reactions

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY in patients with severe (Grade 3) or life-threatening (Grade 4) infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild (Grade 1) or moderate (Grade 2) infusion-related reactions. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 6.4% (127/1994) of patients. In a separate trial in which patients received OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion or a 30- minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (8/368) and 2.7% (10/369) of patients, respectively. Additionally, 0.5% (2/368) and 1.4% (5/369) of patients, respectively, experienced adverse reactions within 48 hours of infusion that led to dose delay, permanent discontinuation or withholding of OPDIVO. In melanoma patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.5% (10/407) of patients. In HCC patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 8% (4/49) of patients. In RCC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 5.1% (28/547) of patients. In MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 4.2% (5/119) of patients. In MPM patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 12% (37/300) of patients.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with OPDIVO or YERVOY. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between OPDIVO or YERVOY and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. The effects of YERVOY are likely to be greater during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Increased Mortality in Patients with Multiple Myeloma when OPDIVO is Added to a Thalidomide Analogue and Dexamethasone

In randomized clinical trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of OPDIVO to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with multiple myeloma with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of OPDIVO or YERVOY in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=268). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 42% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse drug reactions reported in 2% to <5% of patients receiving OPDIVO were abdominal pain, hyponatremia, increased aspartate aminotransferase, and increased lipase. In Checkmate 066, serious adverse reactions occurred in 36% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=206). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were gamma-glutamyltransferase increase (3.9%) and diarrhea (3.4%). In Checkmate 067, serious adverse reactions (74% and 44%), adverse reactions leading to permanent discontinuation (47% and 18%) or to dosing delays (58% and 36%), and Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (72% and 51%) all occurred more frequently in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) relative to the OPDIVO arm (n=313). The most frequent (≥10%) serious adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm and the OPDIVO arm, respectively, were diarrhea (13% and 2.2%), colitis (10% and 1.9%), and pyrexia (10% and 1.0%). In Checkmate 238, serious adverse reactions occurred in 18% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=452). Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions occurred in 25% of OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452). The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of OPDIVO-treated patients were diarrhea and increased lipase and amylase. In Checkmate 816, serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients (n=176) who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions in >2% included pneumonia and vomiting. No fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. In Checkmate 227, serious adverse reactions occurred in 58% of patients (n=576). The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea/colitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis, pulmonary embolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hypophysitis. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 1.7% of patients; these included events of pneumonitis (4 patients), myocarditis, acute kidney injury, shock, hyperglycemia, multi-system organ failure, and renal failure. In Checkmate 9LA, serious adverse reactions occurred in 57% of patients (n=358). The most frequent (>2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea, febrile neutropenia, anemia, acute kidney injury, musculoskeletal pain, dyspnea, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 7 (2%) patients, and included hepatic toxicity, acute renal failure, sepsis, pneumonitis, diarrhea with hypokalemia, and massive hemoptysis in the setting of thrombocytopenia. In Checkmate 017 and 057, serious adverse reactions occurred in 46% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, dyspnea, pyrexia, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. In Checkmate 057, fatal adverse reactions occurred; these included events of infection (7 patients, including one case of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia), pulmonary embolism (4 patients), and limbic encephalitis (1 patient). In Checkmate 743, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were pneumonia, pyrexia, diarrhea, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, dyspnea, acute kidney injury, infusion-related reaction, musculoskeletal pain, and pulmonary embolism. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4 (1.3%) patients and included pneumonitis, acute heart failure, sepsis, and encephalitis. In Checkmate 214, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pyrexia, pneumonia, pneumonitis, hypophysitis, acute kidney injury, dyspnea, adrenal insufficiency, and colitis. In Checkmate 9ER, serious adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pneumonia, pneumonitis, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, and hyponatremia. Fatal intestinal perforations occurred in 3 (0.9%) patients. In Checkmate 025, serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were acute kidney injury, pleural effusion, pneumonia, diarrhea, and hypercalcemia. In Checkmate 205 and 039, adverse reactions leading to discontinuation occurred in 7% and dose delays due to adverse reactions occurred in 34% of patients (n=266). Serious adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥1% of patients were pneumonia, infusion-related reaction, pyrexia, colitis or diarrhea, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and rash. Eleven patients died from causes other than disease progression: 3 from adverse reactions within 30 days of the last OPDIVO dose, 2 from infection 8 to 9 months after completing OPDIVO, and 6 from complications of allogeneic HSCT. In Checkmate 141, serious adverse reactions occurred in 49% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, dyspnea, respiratory failure, respiratory tract infection, and sepsis. In Checkmate 275, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were urinary tract infection, sepsis, diarrhea, small intestine obstruction, and general physical health deterioration. In Checkmate 274, serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=351). The most frequent serious adverse reaction reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO was urinary tract infection. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 1% of patients; these included events of pneumonitis (0.6%). In Checkmate 901, serious adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reporting in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO with chemotherapy were urinary tract infection (4.9%), acute kidney injury (4.3%), anemia (3%), pulmonary embolism (2.6%), sepsis (2.3%), and platelet count decreased (2.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3.6% of patients who received OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included sepsis (1%). OPDIVO and/or chemotherapy were discontinued in 30% of patients and were delayed in 67% of patients for an adverse reaction. In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were colitis/diarrhea, hepatic events, abdominal pain, acute kidney injury, pyrexia, and dehydration. In Checkmate 040, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥4% of patients were pyrexia, diarrhea, anemia, increased AST, adrenal insufficiency, ascites, esophageal varices hemorrhage, hyponatremia, increased blood bilirubin, and pneumonitis. In Attraction-3, serious adverse reactions occurred in 38% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=209). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO were pneumonia, esophageal fistula, interstitial lung disease, and pyrexia. The following fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO: interstitial lung disease or pneumonitis (1.4%), pneumonia (1.0%), septic shock (0.5%), esophageal fistula (0.5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (0.5%), pulmonary embolism (0.5%), and sudden death (0.5%). In Checkmate 577, serious adverse reactions occurred in 33% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=532). A serious adverse reaction reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO was pneumonitis. A fatal reaction of myocardial infarction occurred in one patient who received OPDIVO. In Checkmate 648, serious adverse reactions occurred in 62% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=310). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO with chemotherapy were pneumonia (11%), dysphagia (7%), esophageal stenosis (2.9%), acute kidney injury (2.9%), and pyrexia (2.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 5 (1.6%) patients who received OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included pneumonitis, pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumonia, and acute kidney injury. In Checkmate 648, serious adverse reactions occurred in 69% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY (n=322). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% who received OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY were pneumonia (10%), pyrexia (4.3%), pneumonitis (4.0%), aspiration pneumonia (3.7%), dysphagia (3.7%), hepatic function abnormal (2.8%), decreased appetite (2.8%), adrenal insufficiency (2.5%), and dehydration (2.5%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 5 (1.6%) patients who received OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY; these included pneumonitis, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary embolism, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In Checkmate 649, serious adverse reactions occurred in 52% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy were vomiting (3.7%), pneumonia (3.6%), anemia (3.6%), pyrexia (2.8%), diarrhea (2.7%), febrile neutropenia (2.6%), and pneumonitis (2.4%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 16 (2.0%) patients who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included pneumonitis (4 patients), febrile neutropenia (2 patients), stroke (2 patients), gastrointestinal toxicity, intestinal mucositis, septic shock, pneumonia, infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, mesenteric vessel thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In Checkmate 76K, serious adverse reactions occurred in 18% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=524). Adverse reactions which resulted in permanent discontinuation of OPDIVO in >1% of patients included arthralgia (1.7%), rash (1.7%), and diarrhea (1.1%). A fatal adverse reaction occurred in 1 (0.2%) patient (heart failure and acute kidney injury). The most frequent Grade 3-4 lab abnormalities reported in ≥1% of OPDIVO-treated patients were increased lipase (2.9%), increased AST (2.2%), increased ALT (2.1%), lymphopenia (1.1%), and decreased potassium (1.0%).

Common Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, the most common adverse reaction (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=268) was rash (21%). In Checkmate 066, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=206) vs dacarbazine (n=205) were fatigue (49% vs 39%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 25%), rash (28% vs 12%), and pruritus (23% vs 12%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) were fatigue (62%), diarrhea (54%), rash (53%), nausea (44%), pyrexia (40%), pruritus (39%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), cough (27%), headache (26%), dyspnea (24%), upper respiratory tract infection (23%), arthralgia (21%), and increased transaminases (25%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO arm (n=313) were fatigue (59%), rash (40%), musculoskeletal pain (42%), diarrhea (36%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pruritus (27%), upper respiratory tract infection (22%), decreased appetite (22%), headache (22%), constipation (21%), arthralgia (21%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 238, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452) vs ipilimumab-treated patients (n=453) were fatigue (57% vs 55%), diarrhea (37% vs 55%), rash (35% vs 47%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 27%), pruritus (28% vs 37%), headache (23% vs 31%), nausea (23% vs 28%), upper respiratory infection (22% vs 15%), and abdominal pain (21% vs 23%). The most common immune-mediated adverse reactions were rash (16%), diarrhea/colitis (6%), and hepatitis (3%). In Checkmate 816, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm (n=176) were nausea (38%), constipation (34%), fatigue (26%), decreased appetite (20%), and rash (20%). In Checkmate 227, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (44%), rash (34%), decreased appetite (31%), musculoskeletal pain (27%), diarrhea/colitis (26%), dyspnea (26%), cough (23%), hepatitis (21%), nausea (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 9LA, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (49%), musculoskeletal pain (39%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (31%), rash (30%), decreased appetite (28%), constipation (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 017 and 057, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418) were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, cough, dyspnea, and decreased appetite. In Checkmate 743, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY were fatigue (43%), musculoskeletal pain (38%), rash (34%), diarrhea (32%), dyspnea (27%), nausea (24%), decreased appetite (24%), cough (23%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 214, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients treated with OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547) were fatigue (58%), rash (39%), diarrhea (38%), musculoskeletal pain (37%), pruritus (33%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pyrexia (25%), arthralgia (23%), decreased appetite (21%), dyspnea (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 9ER, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320) were diarrhea (64%), fatigue (51%), hepatotoxicity (44%), palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (40%), stomatitis (37%), rash (36%), hypertension (36%), hypothyroidism (34%), musculoskeletal pain (33%), decreased appetite (28%), nausea (27%), dysgeusia (24%), abdominal pain (22%), cough (20%) and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 025, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406) vs everolimus (n=397) were fatigue (56% vs 57%), cough (34% vs 38%), nausea (28% vs 29%), rash (28% vs 36%), dyspnea (27% vs 31%), diarrhea (25% vs 32%), constipation (23% vs 18%), decreased appetite (23% vs 30%), back pain (21% vs 16%), and arthralgia (20% vs 14%). In Checkmate 205 and 039, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=266) were upper respiratory tract infection (44%), fatigue (39%), cough (36%), diarrhea (33%), pyrexia (29%), musculoskeletal pain (26%), rash (24%), nausea (20%) and pruritus (20%). In Checkmate 141, the most common adverse reactions (≥10%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236) were cough (14%) and dyspnea (14%) at a higher incidence than investigator’s choice. In Checkmate 275, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270) were fatigue (46%), musculoskeletal pain (30%), nausea (22%), and decreased appetite (22%). In Checkmate 274, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=351) were rash (36%), fatigue (36%), diarrhea (30%), pruritus (30%), musculoskeletal pain (28%), and urinary tract infection (22%).In Checkmate 901, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were nausea, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, constipation, decreased appetite, rash, vomiting, and peripheral neuropathy. In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO as a single agent (n=74), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (54%), diarrhea (43%), abdominal pain (34%), nausea (34%), vomiting (28%), musculoskeletal pain (28%), cough (26%), pyrexia (24%), rash (23%), constipation (20%), and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (49%), diarrhea (45%), pyrexia (36%), musculoskeletal pain (36%), abdominal pain (30%), pruritus (28%), nausea (26%), rash (25%), decreased appetite (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 040, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49), were rash (53%), pruritus (53%), musculoskeletal pain (41%), diarrhea (39%), cough (37%), decreased appetite (35%), fatigue (27%), pyrexia (27%), abdominal pain (22%), headache (22%), nausea (20%), dizziness (20%), hypothyroidism (20%), and weight decreased (20%). In Attraction-3, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=209) were rash (22%) and decreased appetite (21%). In Checkmate 577, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=532) were fatigue (34%), diarrhea (29%), nausea (23%), rash (21%), musculoskeletal pain (21%), and cough (20%). In Checkmate 648, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=310) were nausea (65%), decreased appetite (51%), fatigue (47%), constipation (44%), stomatitis (44%), diarrhea (29%), and vomiting (23%). In Checkmate 648, the most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY were rash (31%), fatigue (28%), pyrexia (23%), nausea (22%), diarrhea (22%), and constipation (20%). In Checkmate 649, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782) were peripheral neuropathy (53%), nausea (48%), fatigue (44%), diarrhea (39%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), abdominal pain (27%), constipation (25%), and musculoskeletal pain (20%). In Checkmate 76K, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=524) were fatigue (36%), musculoskeletal pain (30%), rash (28%), diarrhea (23%) and pruritus (20%).

Please see US Full Prescribing Information for OPDIVO and YERVOY.

Clinical Trials and Patient Populations

Checkmate 227–previously untreated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9LA–previously untreated recurrent or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in combination with YERVOY and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy by histology; Checkmate 649–previously untreated advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction and esophageal adenocarcinoma; Checkmate 577–adjuvant treatment of esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer; Checkmate 238–adjuvant treatment of patients with completely resected Stage III or Stage IV melanoma; Checkmate 76K–adjuvant treatment of patients 12 years of age and older with completely resected Stage IIB or Stage IIC melanoma; Checkmate 274–adjuvant treatment of urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 275–previously treated advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 142–MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 142–MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Attraction-3–esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 648–previously untreated, unresectable advanced recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 648–previously untreated, unresectable advanced recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 040–hepatocellular carcinoma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 743–previously untreated unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 037–previously treated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 066–previously untreated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 067–previously untreated metastatic melanoma, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 017–second-line treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 057–second-line treatment of metastatic non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 816–neoadjuvant non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy; Checkmate 901–Adult patients with unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 141–recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Checkmate 025–previously treated renal cell carcinoma; Checkmate 214–previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9ER–previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with cabozantinib; Checkmate 205/039–classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

OPDUALAG logo

OPDUALAG IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions (IMARs) listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.

IMARs which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. IMARs can occur at any time after starting treatment with a LAG-3 and PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. While IMARs usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of Opdualag. Early identification and management of IMARs are essential to ensure safe use. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying IMARs. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected IMARs, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if Opdualag requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose IMARs are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis, which may be fatal. In patients treated with other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies, the incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.7% (13/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.6%), and Grade 2 (2.3%) adverse reactions. Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.8% and withholding of Opdualag in 1.4% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated colitis, defined as requiring use of corticosteroids and no clear alternate etiology. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

Immune-mediated diarrhea or colitis occurred in 7% (24/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (4.5%) adverse reactions. Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 2% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.8% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated hepatitis, defined as requiring the use of corticosteroids and no clear alternate etiology.

Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 6% (20/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (3.4%), and Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.7% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.3% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Opdualag can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, hypophysitis, thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can be present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. In patients receiving Opdualag, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 4.2% (15/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (1.4%) and Grade 2 (2.5%) adverse reactions. Adrenal insufficiency led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.1% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.8% of patients.

Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis occurred in 2.5% (9/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.3%) and Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hypophysitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.3% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.6% of patients.

Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis occurred in 2.8% (10/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (1.1%) adverse reactions. Thyroiditis did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Thyroiditis led to withholding of Opdualag in 0.3% of patients. Hyperthyroidism occurred in 6% (22/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hyperthyroidism did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Hyperthyroidism led to withholding of Opdualag in 0.3% of patients. Hypothyroidism occurred in 17% (59/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (11%) adverse reactions. Hypothyroidism led to the permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.3% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.5% of patients.

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Diabetes occurred in 0.3% (1/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, a Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reaction, and no cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetes did not lead to the permanent discontinuation or withholding of Opdualag in any patient.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated nephritis, which is defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear etiology. In patients receiving Opdualag, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 2% (7/355) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (0.8%) adverse reactions. Immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.8% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.6% of patients.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear alternate etiology. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and Drug Rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms has occurred with PD-1/L-1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

Immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (33/355) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (3.4%) adverse reactions. Immune-mediated rash did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Immune-mediated rash led to withholding of Opdualag in 1.4% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Myocarditis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated myocarditis, which is defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear alternate etiology. The diagnosis of immune-mediated myocarditis requires a high index of suspicion. Patients with cardiac or cardio-pulmonary symptoms should be assessed for potential myocarditis. If myocarditis is suspected, withhold dose, promptly initiate high dose steroids (prednisone or methylprednisolone 1 to 2 mg/kg/day) and promptly arrange cardiology consultation with diagnostic workup. If clinically confirmed, permanently discontinue Opdualag for Grade 2-4 myocarditis.

Myocarditis occurred in 1.7% (6/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (1.1%) adverse reactions. Myocarditis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.7% of patients.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant IMARs occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received Opdualag or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: Cardiac/Vascular: pericarditis, vasculitis; Nervous System: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; Ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other IMARs, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss; Gastrointestinal: pancreatitis including increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue: Myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae including renal failure), arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; Endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; Other (Hematologic/Immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

Opdualag can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue Opdualag in patients with severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild to moderate infusion-related reactions. In patients who received Opdualag as a 60-minute intravenous infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 7% (23/355) of patients.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/PD-L1 receptor blocking antibody. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1 receptor blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and data from animal studies, Opdualag can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Opdualag for at least 5 months after the last dose of Opdualag.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of Opdualag in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effect on milk production. Because nivolumab and relatlimab may be excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise patients not to breastfeed during treatment with Opdualag and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Relativity-047, fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3 (0.8%) patients who were treated with Opdualag; these included hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, acute edema of the lung, and pneumonitis. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 36% of patients treated with Opdualag. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥1% of patients treated with Opdualag were adrenal insufficiency (1.4%), anemia (1.4%), colitis (1.4%), pneumonia (1.4%), acute myocardial infarction (1.1%), back pain (1.1%), diarrhea (1.1%), myocarditis (1.1%), and pneumonitis (1.1%).

Common Adverse Reactions and Laboratory Abnormalities

The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of the patients treated with Opdualag were musculoskeletal pain (45%), fatigue (39%), rash (28%), pruritus (25%), and diarrhea (24%).

The most common laboratory abnormalities that occurred in ≥20% of patients treated with Opdualag were decreased hemoglobin (37%), decreased lymphocytes (32%), increased AST (30%), increased ALT (26%), and decreased sodium (24%).

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for Opdualag.

References:

  1. OPDIVO [package insert]. Princeton, NJ: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; 2023.
  2. Forde PM, Spicer J, Lu S, et al. Neoadjuvant nivolumab plus chemotherapy in resectable lung cancer. N Engl J Med. 2022;386:1973-1985.
  3. Forde PM, Spicer J, Girard N, et al. Neoadjuvant nivolumab plus platinum-doublet chemotherapy for resectable NSCLC: 3-year update from CheckMate 816. Oral presentation at ELCC 2023. Abstract 840.
  4. Girard N, Spicer J, Mariano P, et al. Nivolumab (NIVO) + platinum-doublet chemotherapy (chemo) vs chemo as neoadjuvant treatment for resectable (IB-IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Event-free survival (EFS) results from the phase 3 CheckMate 816 trial. Oral presentation at AACR 2022. Abstract CT012.
  5. Forde PM, Spicer J, Lu S, et al. Nivolumab + platinum-doublet chemotherapy vs chemotherapy as neoadjuvant treatment for resectable (IB-IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer in the phase 3 CheckMate 816 trial. Oral presentation at AACR 2021. Abstract CT003.
  6. Spicer J, Wang C, Tanaka F, et al. Surgical outcomes from the phase 3 CheckMate 816 trial: nivolumab + platinum-doublet chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone as neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Oral presentation at ASCO 2021. Abstract 8503.
  7. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. V.2.2023. ©National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2023. All rights reserved. Accessed March 8, 2023. To view the most recent and complete version of the guidelines, go online to NCCN.org.

7356-US-2300484  12/23

This website is best viewed
using the horizontal display
on your tablet device.

This website is best viewed
using the vertical display on
your mobile device.